Cessationism, Miracles, and Tongues: Part 2

Last updated on November 25th, 2017 at 05:30 am

This is part 2 of the series on cessationism, miracles, and tongues. There are two thoughts addressed in this article. Firstly, why miracles were de-emphasized during the Reformation. Secondly, an analysis on the protestant revision of miracles in the early church.

For information on this overall series and a general summary go to Cessationism, Miracles and Tongues: Part 1

The Excess of Miracles in the Medieval World

Cessationism or the

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Cessationism, Miracles, and Tongues: Part 1

Last updated on November 25th, 2017 at 05:22 am

This four-part series follows the perceptions of miracles and the doctrine of cessationism from inception until now in the protestant church, especially as it relates to the doctrine of tongues.

Table of Contents

  • Part 1
  • Introduction
  • Reasons for the rise of Cessationism
  • Part 2
  • The Excess of Miracles in the Medieval world
  • The earlier De-Emphatics: John Chrysostom, Augustine Bishop of Hippo, Cyril of Alexandria*, and Thomas
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Epiphanius on the Problem Tongues of Corinth

Epiphanius Bishop of Salamis

The Epiphanius text on the tongues problem in the first century Corinthian Church.

This fourth century or later writing is one of the most important texts in trying to rebuild a historical model for explaining the tongues problem at Corinth.

The text is customarily credited to Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis in the fourth century. This text may have been heavily edited, redacted and even added over

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Cyril of Alexandria on Tongues: I Corinthians

Portions of a commentary on I Corinthians attributed to Cyril of Alexandria translated into English.

The translations selected are those relating to the doctrine of tongues.

Tradition asserts the text by Cyril, further study indicates some pieces are from the works of Didymus of Alexandria. Although the majority belongs to Cyril, it cannot be exactly determined which pieces are Didymus’ accounts. For more information see Cyril of Alexandria on Tongues Intro.

I Corinthians 12:9

Thus we say

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Cyril of Alexandria on Tongues: Conclusion

Final thoughts on the texts attributed to Cyril of Alexandria about the doctrine of tongues.

A significant amount of time and labour has been spent on works attributed to Cyril of Alexandria on the Christian doctrine of tongues and for good reason. The Cyrillian coverage offers critical insights into the ancient practice of the gift of tongues within the earlier Church.

These works originate under the influence of the ancient city of Alexandria, Egypt, which gives these works particular significance.

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Cyril of Alexandria on Tongues: I Corinthians 14:16 to 17

An English translation of the catena on I Corinthians 14:16-17 attributed to Cyril of Alexandria.

This translation is based on two texts. The Monte Athos edition, found in Philippus Pusey’s publication, is the one selected as the basis. This is due to it having more copy than the text found in Migne Patrologia Graeca. MPG was extensively analyzed and compared where both accounts are similar.

Translated from: Cyrilli Alexandrini. Cyrilli: Archiepiscopi Alexandrini In D. Joannis Evangelium. Edited by

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The mysterious anaplêrôn of I Corinthians 14:16

Last updated on January 20th, 2018 at 10:32 pm

The mysterious anaplêrôn in the Corinthian Church.

The Apostle Paul referred to the word anaplêrôn as part of the highly controversial gift of tongues passage (I Corinthians 14:16). Discovering the historical meaning to this word may offer a significant clue that may work towards unlocking the meaning of the this problem text.

The tongues passage is an age-old mystery that has never been completely resolved. Some think Paul referred to heavenly

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Cyril of Alexandria on Tongues: I Corinthians 14:15

The following is a translation from the Greek, with some help from a parallel Latin translation of a catena on I Corinthians 14:15 attributed to Cyril of Alexandria.

This is part of an ongoing series on identifying the Christian tongues doctrine from the texts attributed to Cyril of Alexandria.

This translation is based on two manuscripts. The Monte Athos edition found in Philippus Pusey’s publication is the one selected as the basis due to it having more copy, though the

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Notes on the Cyrillian Catena on I Corinthians 14:15

The challenges and discoveries related to translating the catena of I Corinthians 14:15 attributed to Cyril of Alexandria.

I Corinthians 14:15 has a high difficulty level for translation. First of all it uses older Greek forms than New Testament Greek.

There is no subjunctive used here. Mostly the infinitive, and infrequently the optative are utilized instead. This is unusual because the infinitive used as a subjunctive and the use of the optative were to have been removed from the Greek

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