Book Review; 1-3 John: A General Reader

Last updated on September 6th, 2018 at 09:26 pm

A book which attempts and succeeds at helping novice to advanced Greek New Testament students improve their reading and textual critical skills.

I John : A General Reader, edited by J. Klay Harrison and Chad M. Foster, aims to target those finished with the basics of New Testament Greek and want to advance their skills — an area that is greatly lacking

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Donnegan's Greek Dictionary Updated

An updated version of Donnegan’s A New Greek and English Lexicon; Principally on the plan of the Greek and German Lexicon of Schneider is available.

This work has a niche in defining philosophical and platonic Greek words.

This digital file was originally scanned by Google but I have improved it in three ways:

  • An alphabetical index has been added to the file so that it is easier

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Ancient Greek Dictionaries for Download

Locating and downloading ancient Greek dictionaries.

Thanks to the internet there is a vast array of ancient Greek dictionaries available for the translator. This was unheard of even 10 years ago. This speeds up the process of translating by a factor of at least 10 times.

These dictionaries are all old, and there are no copyright restrictions. Some are not English-Greek dictionaries, and the majority are in non-text searchable and large pdf files, but these are some of the best

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A Sample Process of Translating Alexandrian Greek

A sample of the trials, struggles, and success with translating Alexandrian Greek into English.

Third to fifth century Alexandrian Greek is often difficult to translate. It is a melting pot of many different Greek dialects, plus their own oddities. This distinct nuance of the Alexandrian writers during the early centuries has not been clearly documented. Therefore when one approaches these writers, it is a big challenge. And if one likes challenges, this can be fun, but frustrating as

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Diacritics in Ancient Greek

Polytonic Greek diacritics, the markings seen above Greek letters, indicate the proper pronunciation. Most novice and intermediate Greek translators ignore these characters, but familiarity with these little markings is a great timesaver and avoids potential translation errors.

For example, the confusing words: ην, η, and ως, each one can have a number of different meanings. A person can use context to decide which meaning is to be used, but a quick glance at the diacritic along with context

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Ancient Digitized Greek Dictionaries

Last updated on September 18th, 2018 at 10:33 pm

Links for downloading a variety of ancient Greek dictionaries.

Thanks to the internet there is a vast array of ancient Greek dictionaries available for the translator. This was unheard of even ten years ago. This speeds up the process of translating by a factor of at least ten times.

The following dictionaries listed are all old, and there are no copyright restrictions. Some are not English-Greek dictionaries, none are text searchable,

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Greek Lexicon searches using Google Books

Google Books search engine allows one to enter actual Greek text as a searchable parameter.

This is a very special resource for those who wish to read or translate the Greek Church Fathers. Google Books can be used as one massive Greek Lexicon database.

It still isn’t quite as concise or have the ability to breakdown a conjugation or declension to its root form as the Perseus digital library does but where Perseus lacks in ecclesiastical

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The Various Uses of the Infinitive in Ancient Greek

Mastering the various nuances of the infinitive is one of the key elements in translating Patristic Greek.

The infinitive in Ecclesiastical Greek can be easy to translate when used normally, but tough when it comes to advanced forms.

It is easy to spot an infinitive because its ending usually takes on the -ειν as the ending such as:

  • ἄρχειν — οἱ δοκοῦντες ἄρχειν τῶν ἐθνῶν, “they which are accounted to rule over the Gentiles,” (KJV; Mark 10:42)

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The Mysterious Latin Gerundive

This is an in-depth look at the problems of translating the Latin gerundive and potential solutions.

For example, the so-called Patristic-Latin Ambrosiaster text utilized the gerundive on at least two occasions in its commentary on the Book of Corinthians in the 14th chapter. This is not a problem for a Latin writer to do, but the English lacks a direct equivalent. This leads to the question, how does one translate the gerundive here?

First before delving into the text, one

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Grammar for Gemara and Targum Onkelos

Grammar for Gemara and Targum Onkelos: an Introduction to Aramaic, by Yitzhak Frank, is an exceptionally well done grammar for those wishing to read, learn, and translate the Talmud Babli or Targum Onkelos.

It is the standard for Jewish Babylonian Aramaic grammars, comparable in calibre to the leading Latin and Greek ones.

This reference work addresses the common grammatical pitfalls of the classical Hebraist attempting to translate Aramaic.

The serious attention to detail found in the typesetting and formatting makes

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