About

This website is a special blend of textual criticism, linguistics, grammar, theology, Christian mysticism and philosophy from a faith perspective.

This has been a hobby for almost three decades now.

There are so many exciting things about working in an ancient language, a manuscript, or any literature in general. At one moment it is in the language or grammar that captivates. In another moment, it is admiring the creative writing or artwork of a manuscript. Often it is the theological or philosophical insight, or the message itself. Most of all, what I really want is to understand the meaning, and how it applies for today.

It is amazing how a good piece of literature, whether written 3,500 or 10 years ago, never seems old or outdated. A good story, whether it be fiction or non-fiction, never dies. They teach immortal life-lessons.

Reading ancient literature draws a portrait of the human psyche — the good parts, the bad, the innovations, the resistance to change, the humanity, inhumanity, truth, lies, strokes of genius, and demonstrations of sheer silliness. My fascination surrounds people writing about their personal and community identities. They are guideposts on where we fit in the great cosmic story and the continual struggle to survive. These narratives have been ongoing since the creation of man and it is interesting to see this unfold over almost 5000 years of literature.

This passion naturally connects me to the modern people of Israel, Palestine, the Middle East in general. You may also see some contemporary political articles sneak in because of this.

If I had the time, I would like to learn to Arabic, but for the moment, I am limited to Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, Latin, some French. I have also studied older languages such as Sumerian and Akkadian.

The topics in the first four centuries AD demand the most interest because there is so much information to choose from.

This website is not intended to defend or market established doctrine. Although I work from an Evangelical bias, I am not employed by any religious institution. This gives me the creative and intellectual flexibility to approach subjects without a framework of preconceived doctrines. The negative of this is accountability. I can, at any time, go off-on-the-deep end on any subject. You as a reader will have to decide.

My background is a BA from Winnipeg Bible College (now known as Providence University College) which is located in the province of Manitoba, Canada. This school encouraged in-depth religious instruction, Bible memorization, prayer, character development, service, and other important spiritual disciplines. A desire to know more brought me to the Hebrew University Overseas Student Program in Israel. This was where I began the journey into languages and manuscripts.

Charles Sullivan